TYPOJANCHI
korean typography biennale
seoul, south korea
30.03.16 - 10.05.16

I was asked to produce a typographic installation piece for an exhibition at the Typojanchi Biennale in Seoul. I was given a set of Google map coordinates in which to respond from as a briefing. In turn, this lead me outside The Seventeenth Church of Christ Scientist in Chicago.

Heal The Sick. Raise The Dead. Cleanse The Lepers. Cast Out Demons.

It is believed by some scientists that there is a spiritual part of the brain that activates only when people pray or meditate. Inspired by the Christian Science Church, this piece explores the theme of when science meets religion and the nuances surrounding this supposed oxymoron. The objective was to locate a visual that somehow conveys the collision of practices and then implement it typographically.

The floating matter featured in the poster is a vector trace highlighting the parts of the brain that become active only when someone prays. The information was taken from a scan of brain activity whilst a subject is praying.

The poster produced is based on E Upper Wacker Dr Chicago, Illinois which features Harry Weese’s enigmatic building; The Seventeenth Church of Christ Scientist.

TYPOJANCHI
korean typography biennale
seoul, south korea
30.03.16 - 10.05.16

Type installation at the Typojanchi Biennale in Seoul.

THE SHEFFIELD CONTEMPORARY
abbeydale picture house
sheffield
03.03.17 - 00.00.00

We transformed a 100-year-old disused secret theatre into a cutting edge contemporary art space in Sheffield.

The Sheffield Contemporary is an artistic and cultural centre based in the Abbeydale Picture house in Sheffield. The space features a gallery, bookshop and a bar.

The Space

The breathtaking space, restored by hand, is a Grade 2 listed theatre, formerly bolted shut and unexplored by the public; the previously inaccessible space had faced an entire century of disuse.

What was once a vibrant and functioning theatrical arts hub became increasingly redundant as the popularity of cinema rose and the demand for live theatre and performance depleted.

We wanted the nature of the gallery to echo the intangible heritage of the space, focusing on the tension between the obsolete and the cutting edge within cinema. The premise of the first exhibition critically echoes the space’s history, concentrating on the ever-fluid methods of how moving image and performance evolves within the arts.

The curated selection of featured artists challenge themes such as materiality, obsolescence and memory in moving image. The artist’s subject matter collectively mirrors the factors that originally threatened the space and by doing so pushes it into the future of media.

The spatial design is especially intended to address the nature of decentralized media and self-reflectivity in cinema, and how this is exposed in the public domain today.

The project team consisted of two young architectural designers, Louis Koseda and Sam Atkinson, who have a wealth of experience working with heritage buildings and social projects, and creative director Sebastian Koseda, who has worked in the cultural design sphere for over 10 years. Collectively they have worked to get the gallery up and running, which included curation, branding, scenography, production, fabrication, and installation.

The restoration of the gallery was instigated as a passion project after the trio discovered that the majestic space had been disused for 100 years.

Despite the era-defining space’s rich character, it had become a prime example of stagnant conservationism. The building contains, among many other heritage features, the UK’s only working fire curtain from the golden era of cinema.

Together the team are working to lead the progressive restoration of the building in collaboration with CADS, a Sheffield-based arts charity.



Support the Sheffield Contemporary ---



Strikingly, the Sheffield Contemporary is purely self-funded to this point and was achieved with an incredibly low budget of £1000 along with an entire community of support.

Tools, time and materials have been selflessly donated by Sheffield’s artistic evangelists, who want to see the great space step into the 21st century.

We are currently openly calling for funders and artistic patrons to get in touch to help the project in its next steps. We hope the first few exhibitions and all the hard work in bringing the space to life will add traction to our proposals.



Please contact---

hello@sheffieldcontemporary.org

07867123210

Where timeworn media makes way for the new, moving image, artists need to constantly engage in discourse surrounding the shift from centralised media to de-centralised media. In the time of multi-platform, responsive and interactive placements, this begs the question, how will cinema respond?



Branding

The Sheffield Contemporary brand embraces a collision of the industrial heritage of the area and it’s contemporary content. The brand’s characteristic features are formed of graphic visual cues sourced from classic electro-plating diagrams.

The brand system is modular and can shift and evolve parallel to the gallery. Glyphs are replaced with icons or artifacts that represent current themes within the space whilst retaining legibility.

SHEFFIELD CONTEMPORARY
abbeydale picture house
sheffield
03.03.17 - 00.00.00

Branding and curation for Sheffield Contemporary

FEED ALL HANDS
tea building,
shoreditch, london
26.05.15 - 00.00.00

I have been working as a Creative Director for the last year at the digital design studio FEED.

Every month a discussion takes place in London, Madrid, San Francisco, Berlin and Manchester, which aligns all the creative work from the studio.

The objective is to map the creative progress and new territories of the company, as well as celebrate successes. The featured poster focuses on the materiality of the hand and the fluidity of our digital reach.

www.feed.xyz

FEED ALL HANDS
tea building,
shoreditch, london
26.05.15 - 00.00.00

Poster for FEED Creative All Hands

MUTE RECORDS
hammersmith, london
26.09.16 - 30.12.16

How would a logo warp if it were affected by radio static?
When asked to modify the MUTE brand, we wanted to visualise the grit and heritage of the label whilst keeping the logo distinctively graphic.

The merchandise features a modified ‘Isonorm italic’ as used in the artwork for the classic MUTE releases. The font was redrawn with four different levels of ‘white noise intensity’ making it scalable for different application purposes.

Project in collaboration with Adrian Shaughnessy

MUTE RECORDS
hammersmith, london
26.09.16 - 30.12.16

Brand refresh for Mute Records merchandise
In collaboration with Adrian Shaughnessy

IGOR & MORENO
russel square, london
03.06.15 - 00.00.00

Igor and Moreno make work about people and what makes us such special animals. Their work is characterised by their interest in the moving body and the immediacy of action as a vehicle for meaning, ideas and desires.

I was asked by Igor and Moreno to help frame the duality and eccentricities of their performances, together we we undertook a branding exercise to get to the core of what they wanted their graphic identity to say and how.

Igor and Moreno ’share their views without dictating a single reading, instead creating space for reflection for the viewer.’ This viewpoint became an anchor for their brand allowing ambiguity to influence the typography in the form of a tilt shift blurred effect.

Branding the contemporary dancers was an exciting and fulfilling experience both are bursting with ideas and eager to work in innovative and experimental ways.

Igor and Moreno have presented their works extensively in Europe and also in the USA and Chile and have won various prestigious awards.

The brand is evolving with every new project and I am very proud to work with such talented and lovely guys.

IGOR & MORENO
russel square, london
03.06.15 - 00.00.00

Branding for contemporary dance duo Igor & Moreno

LONG LIVE SOUTHBANK
southbank, belvedere road, london
14.03.17 - 12.05.17

The aim of the project was to design and develop a landing page for the Long Live Southbank project to encourage people to donate towards aiding the restoration of one of the most important spaces in skateboarding history.

Long Live Southbank have been working alongside the Southbank Centre to bring forward plans to restore a section of the legendary Southbank Undercroft skate spot that has not been used since 2003.

Design decisions were informed by the modernist simplicity of the brutalist architecture alongside the grittiness and grassroots of the spots subcultural heritage.

The objective of the site is to raise £400k to restore the space.
Please help by donating generously and be part of skateboarding history:
www.llsb.com

LONG LIVE SOUTHBANK
southbank, belvedere road, london
14.03.17 - 12.05.17

Landing page for the Long Live Southbank fundraiser

A SELF PORTRAIT OF YU HAUNG
BY SEBASTIAN KOSEDA
royal college of art wip show
south kensington, london
26.03.15 - 29.06.16

The painting featured was created in Dafen (大芬), China. The piece was painted by Yu Huang of WRIGLEY Oil Painting and commissioned by Sebastian Koseda.
60% of commercial oil paintings produced every year are made in the
village of Dafen, China. The Village is known as the ‘Oil Painting
Village’ and is inhabited by over 8,000 artists who specialise in
the making of large numbers of replica oil paintings by masters
such as Van Gogh, Dalí, da Vinci, Rembrandt and Warhol.

In 2015, Sebastian Koseda asked Yu Huang, an oil painting producer,
to send over an image of himself. Koseda then sent back the image
and requested that Mr. Huang paint it. The painting was then signed
by Mr. Huang with Koseda’s own signature.

This exercise subverts the production process that the service is intended
for and gives a face to an otherwise anonymous artist, the factory worker becomes the product he produces.

The painting can be viewed in two ways, shown in the captions below
(originally shown next to the piece).

Sebastian Koseda
Oil On Canvas.
The artist comments on the value of Chinese mass production in art. The
Chinese Artist Mr. Huang is embraced in a portrait of self-reflection.
Artwork Conceived and signed by the artist.

Yu Huang
Oil On Canvas.
Mr. Huang, the prolific oil painting artist, masterfully captures his own
likeness in order to be exhibited as a shameless misinterpretation at the
Work In Progress show 2015. The client paid Mr. Huang to sign the painting
with the client’s own signature stripping him of ownership from the fin-
ished piece.
A form of creditable art or an example of common exploitation?


The piece aims to challenge themes of identity, authorship and ethics within the ever-increasing outsource culture in the contemporary art world.


‘You have to look at it as if the artist is an architect, and we don’t
have a problem that great architects don’t actually build the houses.’
-Damien Hirst

A SELF PORTRAIT OF YU HAUNG
BY SEBASTIAN KOSEDA
royal college of art wip show
south kensington, london
26.03.15 - 29.06.16

Painting installation in the Hockney Gallery, Royal College of Art

BBC SUB
television centre
white city, london
20.11.15 - 30.12.16

In collaboration with Charles Rickleton.

We were asked to create a brand that works outside of conservative television, one which makes an unrefined impression to get noticed by the right audience (16-24).

Our proposition -
We are advertising to a generation that is fed up of being advertised to.

Young worlds are bombarded with pop-ups, behavioral, geotargeted presumptuous advertising, which exploits their private information.

Individuality is now recommended for you and the line between products and lifestyle become ever more blurred. Intrusive.

According to Marketing Magazine, the demographic usually perceive advertising as ‘something to be endured to reach content they actually want to consume.’

’They have grown up connected to the internet and it’s limitless opportunities, learning to filter through the noise and carefully pinpointing exactly what is worth their time.’

Tech savvy media tactics are quickly counteracted with pop up blockers and ad blockers. The key could be in channeling this attitude against advertising and subverting it into a campaign reflective of this assertive youth.

Added production value is transparent to the generation now so could the way forward be playing with the framework of the medium itself?

The initial concept was to play with the DNA of the television, strip it back to a point where it is trusted by the audience, the challenge was how to implement this visually. Transparency is much more than an advertising buzzword and with this audience it cant be overlooked.

BBC SUB
television centre
white city, london
20.11.15 - 30.12.16

BBC Sub branding concept and billboard at BBC HQ
In collaboration with Charles Rickleton

SCULPTURE PIRACY LES DEBRIS NUMÉRIQUE
rca final show
paris-london
01.02.16 - 06.03.16

4m2 of the Louvre digitally pirated and physically replicated.
Scanned from the Louvre's Dept. of Greek, Etruscan & Roman Antiquities
Paris 4.11.14

Printed and exhibited in the Royal College Of Art
London 1.2.15

Sculpture piracy is the unauthorized duplication of copyrighted sculptures or surrounding content that is then sold or redistributed at a substantially lower quality.
Glitched matter exposes the digital mistranslation as it is pushed back into the physical space. The suspended ‘digital debris’ mimics the 3D interface and the corrupted scans within it.
‘This project embraces the tension between the sublime nature of the original artifacts and the exposed fragmentation of Koseda’s digital piracy technique.’ – David Blamey
The imperfect replication system is reflective of the renaissance ‘polymath’ Leon Battista Alberti, who could be considered to have pioneered the first digitisation of 3D imaging.

‘Not only tomorrow but in a thousand years, he [The Fabricator] will be able to map/relocate it precisely in such a way that there won’t be any part of the sculpture that is misplaced. It will sit in the same position in the air that it was in the first place.’ - Della Pittura - E Della Statua Di Leon Batista Alberti

SCULPTURE PIRACY LES DEBRIS NUMÉRIQUE
rca final show
paris-london
01.02.16 - 06.03.16

4m2 of the Louvre digitally pirated and physically replicated.

BARBICAN MANGASIA
barbican, london
10.10.17 - 00.00.00

Branding proposal in collaboration with Charles Rickleton
The aim of the project was to create a detailed proposal for both the graphic and architectural design of a touring Manga exhibition by the Barbican entitled ‘Mangasia’.
We chose to focus on the typographic contrasts of the different cultures represented in the show by creating a bold set of graphic elements inspired by communicative devices used throughout manga and anime culture.

BARBICAN MANGASIA
barbican, london
10.10.17 - 00.00.00

Proposal for both the graphic and architectural design of ‘Mangasia’ exhibition at the Barbican
Branding proposal in collaboration with Charles Rickleton

ETHICAL HUMAN MEAT
speculative documentary
secret location, london
28.11.15 - 24.05.16

The Ethical Human Meat project was intended to raise questions regarding recent developments in culinary science and has been described as ‘a highly controversial project addressing the ethics of stem cell research, cannibalism and the narcissistic limits of consumption.’

The objective of this project was to develop lab-grown burgers made from the cells of 40 human subjects. Once grown, these human burgers would then be fed back to the subjects.

I teamed up with a group of scientists in London (who chose to remain anonymous for various reasons) in order to develop the lab-grown human meat.
A website was launched in search of 15–30 human subjects to take part in the clinical trial which offered £100 per day. The public’s response was positive and the maximum capacity of applicants was met.
The subjects were invited to come to the lab and have their cells extracted. The cell samples were then developed in petri dishes over a course of 6 weeks, after this time the subjects were invited back to taste their own artificially grown muscle tissue.

The meat is classified as vegetarian as no animals were harmed in the process. There is no blood or fat to connect the tissue but on a cellular level, the meat strips are indistinguishable from human flesh.

The subjects were asked to give feedback regarding the taste, ethics and future of the Ethical Human Meat. A common comment is that the final product tastes similar to bacon.

Based on the feedback received, in-vitro meat has potential to be the future antidote to world hunger and sustainability issues. The world could be saved by, what could be considered, self-cannibalism if marketed properly.

Watch full film here:
(vimeo link to be supplied)

Exhibited at the Henry Moore Gallery
Featured in Elephant Magazine Copyright Issue
Featured on It’s Nice That

ETHICAL HUMAN MEAT
speculative documentary
secret location, london
28.11.15 - 24.05.16

The world could be saved by self-cannibalism if marketed properly.

RESONANCE FM REBRAND
borough high street, london
21.01.16 - 30.03.17

Resonance is a groundbreaking 24-hour radio station which broadcasts to central London, DAB to Greater London and streams to the rest of the world.

Resonance FM is London’s most influential art radio project and they needed a brand evolution that reflected this.

Resonance tasked us with producing a brand logotype that brings their look and feel up to speed with their position as forerunners in the contemporary art sphere.

We created a versatile brand logotype that translates fluidly across onsite, social media, and merchandise as well as above the line marketing.

Resonance seeks to discover, encourage and support a diverse range of artistic voices through radio – from first-timers to seasoned broadcasters.

Listen here:
Resonancefm.com

Project in collaboration with Adrian Shaughnessy

RESONANCE FM REBRAND
borough high street, london
21.01.16 - 30.03.17
Rebranding project for Resonance FM in collaboration with Adrian Shaughnessy

THE HELEN HAMLYN CENTRE FOR DESIGN
royal college of art
battersea, london
24.05.15 - 00.00.00

Over the last two years I have worked closely with The Helen Hamlyn Centre at the Royal College of Art, an institution focusing on design research and projects that will contribute to improving people's lives.

The aim of the project was to develop a brand evolution that brings further clarity to what the centre does, effectively attracting the right audience within digital and social media and raise awareness of the inclusive nature of the centre’s output.

We decided the brand should take a visual tone, which is inclusive, approachable, and human, as such, we incorporated organic hand rendered typography into the guidelines to achieve this. The body of work we developed has involved copywriting, art direction, strategy and design, which was collated in a brand ‘playbook’.

For social media we created a modular copy system to create ‘meme like assets’ which read:

‘HOW CAN DESIGN CHANGE ____________’

This allowed the centre to showcase the brand’s versatility whilst maintaining consistency. How can design change vision, accessibility, disability, lives?

www.hhc.rca.ac.uk

THE HELEN HAMLYN CENTRE FOR DESIGN
royal college of art,
battersea, london
24.05.15 - 00.00.00

Brand collateral focused on design research that contributes to improving people's lives.